Australian bike maker using Titanium Additive Manufacturing to speed up production

October 9, 2014

Flying Machine, a company based in Perth, Australia, is reporting success manufacturing bicycles with customised lugs additively manufactured in titanium. The Australian reports that manufacturing components at the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) on an Arcam electron beam melting machine, has helped make short-run production possible and created hi-tech cottage industries such as Flying Machine.

ti-bike-parts

“We were looking for a way of achieving what we wanted to do for a cost that was viable,” Flying Machines’ Principal, Matthew Andrew, told The Australian.

Andrew had previously considered sourcing custom 3D printed titanium lugs from overseas, but this was too expensive an option. The company formerly sourced steel lugs, which join the bike’s frame together, from overseas with parts taking ten weeks to arrive. With its arrangement with CSIRO, which charges market rates to make the individually-designed lugs, the parts take around ten days to arrive.

The bike maker announced its first prototype early in the year, and has been offering the custom bikes for a few months, attracting international orders.

www.flyingmachine.com.au  

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